Combination of virus, parasites blamed for bee die-offs since 2006


Scientists continue to study the illness that has plagued honeybees in the United States. 30 Jan 11 By RACHEL SAWLOW, Washington Post
MISSOULA, Montana -- Ecologist Colin Henderson co-authored a study that may have identified the cause of the honeybee illness that has plagued U.S. bees since 2006. Henderson, 59, is an associate professor of biology at the University of Montana. He and colleagues there found a correlation between colony collapse disorder (CCD) and a lethal combination of a parasite and a virus.

Alamo Township beekeeper Jeremy Marr goes back to nature to save his hives


Jeremy Marr of Alamo Township checks a bee hive on his parents property in Decatur. Marr recently began writing a blog about natural beekeeping and has raised over $4000 to purchase new hives and equipment. 30 Jan 11 By Rosemary Parker
ALAMO — While scientists around the world try to unravel the ongoing mystery of dying honeybees, an Alamo man has vowed to do what he can on a simpler scale to save bees, one hive at a time.

Vanishing Honeybees


Above: Groups are calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to stop the use of pesticides that are killing bees. 28 Jan 11 By Ed Joyce
Two groups want the Environmental Protection Agency to take action to protect bees from pesticides. Scientists think toxic substances play a role in bee deaths. New research at UC San Diego shows at least one type of pesticide may be a factor.

Alabama beekeepers recruiting to help save bees (with video)


Paul Mancill of the Alabama Beekeepers and Sallie Lee, a regional extension agent, demonstrate how to work with honeybee hives Thursday at Birmingham Botanical Gardens. (Joe Songer -- The Birmingham News) 28 Jan 11 By Thomas Spencer -- The Birmingham News
The old environmental rallying cry of "Save the Trees" may need to replaced with a plea to "Save the Bees!" as scientists continue to document an alarming decline in the population of insects that fill an unsung but invaluable role as natural pollinators.

New research on honeybee illness


Colin Henderson studied squirrels, mice and hares before deciding to focus on honeybees. 25 Jan 11 By The Washington Post
Ecologist Colin Henderson co-authored a study that may have identified the cause of the honeybee illness that has plagued U.S. bees since 2006. Henderson, 59, is an associate professor of biology at the University of Montana. He and colleagues there found a correlation between colony collapse disorder (CCD) and a lethal combination of a parasite and a virus.

New Doubts Raised About Potential Bee-Killing Pesticide


24 Jan 11 By Brandon Keim
A federal entomologist has become the latest researcher to voice doubts about neonicotinoids, a controversial new type of pesticide that may be linked to the collapse of honeybee populations in the United States. The Independent reports that in a documentary screened in Europe but not yet broadcast stateside, USDA bee specialist Jeffrey Pettis describes exposing two groups of bees, one dosed with a neonicotinoid called imidacloprid, to Nosema, a common honeybee disease. Pesticide-dosed bees proved especially vulnerable to infection

USDA Finds Bayer Pesticide Harmful to Honeybees


23 Jan 11 By Natural Vitality Kids
Remember the case of the leaked document showing that the EPA’s own scientists are concerned about a pesticide it approved that might harm fragile honeybee populations? Well, it turns that the EPA isn’t the only government agency whose researchers are worried about neonicotinoid pesticides. USDA researchers also have good evidence that these nicotine-derived chemicals, marketed by German agrichemical giant Bayer, could be playing a part in Colony Collapse Disorder—the mysterious massive honeybee die-offs that United States and Europe have been experiencing in recent years. So why on earth are they still in use on million of acres of American farmland?

Time for pollination of almond crop


MARCI STENBERG Merced Sun-Star - SUN-STAR PHOTO BY MARCI STENBERG Jamen Elliot, center, pumps corn syrup into a bee hive while Jason Conrad, right, keeps the bees quiet by smoking them. At left, Nick Terrones, watches as the bees get fed. The first two weeks of February, these bees will be moved to almond orchards in the area to help with pollination. 15 Jan 11 By Brad Burbaugh
Bees are the most ubiquitous pollinators of agronomic crops, and the unexplained disappearance of these pollinators has scientists, beekeepers and farmers worried.



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Colony Collapse Updates

USDA Releases 2010 Honey Bee Colony Collapse Disorder Progress Report


The 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder Progress Report. Click the image to view the report. 17 Dec 10 By Kim Kaplan
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released the 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) Progress Report highlighting current research on this still mysterious disease affecting the nation's honey bees. The report, which was mandated by Congress in 2008, summarizes research by federal agencies, state departments of agriculture, universities and private organizations to find the cause of CCD and how to stop or mitigate its impact. The report was produced by USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and National Institute of Food and Agriculture.